The text below outlines how the outcomes of each principle will be assessed. A print version of the scorecard is available here.

Growing the
Digital Economy

Principle: Collaboration multiplies Outcomes

Score: 5

Collaboration with multiple parties is very successful and our natural way of working. We have clear arrangements and collaboration practices.

Score: 3

We collaborate with a number of external parties. Some areas are better than others and the arrangements are generally documented at some level.

Score: 1

We collaborate a little but mainly internally and generally by necessity. Few formal arrangements.

Principle: Supporting our Digital Explorers

Score: 5

We have valuable relationships with ACT businesses and participate strongly through the SBIP. We provide access to data and government capabilities which is making local businesses successful.

Score: 3

We have had at least one SBIP candidate initiative that is working well. We are also actively participating in creating a pipeline of activity through SBIP and other channels.

Score: 1

We provide no tangible support to Digital Explorers and have immature relationships with the business community.

Principle: Source commodities globally—add value locally

Score: 5

Commodity IT is sourced at best value—we achieve savings targets. We utilise the benefits of close working in Canberra to add significant IP to enable high quality digital outcomes.

Score: 3

We are in transition, having made progress implementing on commodity platforms. We are developing strong relationships that have the potential to add digital value to our offerings.

Score: 1

We make little distinction between commodity and high value technology. We have not yet made bankable savings—nor have we added much IP to the technology offerings.

Principle: Digital is for everyone

Score: 5

Social outcomes for Canberrans are vastly improved through the use of open data and digital services. The Public Service example is followed by the private sector.

Score: 3

We have provided some data sets that are used to make some good changes for Canberrans. The private sector is noticing what we are doing.

Score: 1

Or digital activity is fairly insular with minimal open data sets being made available. The private sector do not consider the government as an exemplar in this area

Delivering
Digital Services

Principle: Start with the Customer Relationship

Score: 5

The customers see us as a single service provider and is delighted with the consistent and helpful advice and services they receive – whatever the channel

Score: 3

We generally provide a single face to the customer but at times we can be a little fragmented with handoffs to other service areas. Overall though our services are effective.

Score: 1

The customer has to deal with the many silos of government leading to frustrating interactions and at times inconsistent advice. The channels of interaction vary in quality.

Principle: Design for Digital Business

Score: 5

Our new digital services are simple, ‘straight through’ and effective. The customer finds them intuitive, helpful and minimalist.

Score: 3

New services are online and fairly simple to use. Most of them can be completed without intervention or service centre visits

Score: 1

New services still have manual components in them and require service centre visits and letters to be sent. The user interface is acceptable but not digital.

Principle: Assemble Cloud services, Build only when unique

Score: 5

We employ many well-integrated SaaS applications and have a well-maintained set of unique applications.

Score: 3

We have some SaaS applications and they are generally well integrated. However we still have a number of bespoke apps that we will put into SaaS at the next lifecycle point.

Score: 1

We have minimal number of SaaS applications and they are individual service silos that are not well integrated.

Principle: Growing our Digital Capability

Score: 5

We have a rich set of common capabilities and an experienced digital delivery capability. Our applications are open, modular and integrated at a service and data level. We fully leverage the wider digital world through the IoT.

Score: 3

There remains some duplication but we have a good foundation of common capabilities. Our applications are improving in extensibility and modularity. We have some capability to leverage the IoT

Score: 1

We still have many application silos that contain much duplicated code. They are limited by ‘spaghetti’ architecture and waterfall methodologies.

Principle: Digital Service is built on Data

Score: 5

We have a comprehensive set of data to power our service applications. We only ask once.

Score: 3

For most transactions we only have to ask a few questions – but some data is hard to access and we have to ask the same question in different applications.

Score: 1

Our applications don’t really share data – and it is hard to commission new digital apps because it is hard to access the necessary data.

Principle: Digital Services—Mobile Devices

Score: 5

All relevant and/or appropriate services and applications are delivered to mobile devices natively either through apps or HTML5 compliant mobile browsers.

Score: 3

Most services are OK on mobile devices and web pages render usefully on small screens. Some apps are still really only workable on a big screen.

Score: 1

Delivery to mobile devices is patchy. Some work well but others simply don’t render useably on a small screen.

Building
Digital Foundations

Principle: Cloud is our Service Platform

Score: 5

Our infrastructure is all cloud based except where it is more economic in house. The cloud services are dynamically managed for optimal cost-performance.

Score: 3

We are in transition to the cloud but are starting to get benefits and cloud management is maturing.

Score: 1

We have minimal cloud infrastructure. Our cost base is far from optimal.

Principle: Common Capabilities—Common Standards

Score: 5

We have a rich set of Common Capabilities that all directorates use. It has reduced our ‘time to market’ and improved operating costs significantly. We have a well-defined set of standards we work to.

Score: 3

Our collection of Common Capabilities is improving. There remains some duplication but this is largely due to lifecycle alignment. Our standards adoption and use is well advanced with only a few legacy exceptions.

Score: 1

We have few Common Capabilities and there is significant duplication. We have too many standards and too many proprietary technology implementations.

Principle: The Dataculturists

Score: 5

We understand and use data in all of its dimensions. From open and community data through to data governance we obtain great value from our data and consider our governance mature and effective. We are true ‘Datacuturalists’ and participate fully in the Data Working Group.

Score: 3

We have a good open data inventory and are starting to get a single view of customer. Data Governance is still a little siloed but our frameworks are maturing well and we are participating in the Open Data working Group.

Score: 1

We have few open data sets and our use of data for citizen benefit is limited. Data governance is low and dispersed across the directorates.

Principle: The Geospatial Dimension

Score: 5

Geospatial data is fully mainstreamed and embedded in our apps and datasets. We make great use of smartphones capabilities and provide data about the ACT in richly described geospatial terms.

Score: 3

Geospatial data is being embedded in new applications and services. The geospatial description of the ACT is becoming more detailed and useful.

Score: 1

Geospatial is seen and managed as a niche capability required for a few directorates. Geospatial data is not routinely captured or used.

Principle: Responsive Procurement

Score: 5

Our procurement is fair, fast and agile. We have high value relationships supported by effective and appropriate commercial contracts which are actively managed through their lifecycle to provide best value.

Score: 3

Good procurement has established a growing set of relationships that can be leveraged in an agile way. Some procurements are still critical path for projects. Most contractual arrangements are effective.

Score: 1

Procurement in our business group is long and extending project timeframes unnecessarily. Contracts are managed on an ad hoc or exception basis and often reach end of life without a replacement strategy in place.

Principle: Security and Assurance

Score: 5

We have no significant security incidents or privacy breaches and our architecture provides multiple layers of protection. We proactively assure our security outcomes.

Score: 3

We have minimal security incidents but we know about them. As a result we have some audit issues to deal with and our architecture has some single layers of resilience.

Score: 1

We have some security incidents—and we may not even know about them. We do not have a good plan for remediation and have many outstanding audit points.

Principle: Strategic Governance

Score: 5

Governance sets and enables the technology direction in line with the government’s priorities. There is a whole of government digital cohesiveness. Risks are transparent and managed. Ultimately all decisions are made quickly and knowledgeably at the appropriate level in the organisation.

Score: 3

Governance is a positive enabler and the top level accountabilities are in place. At some lower levels there remain some inconsistencies but in general there is a line of sight between the government priorities and what is happening at ground level.

Score: 1

Governance is ad hoc and does not necessarily reflect the accountabilities of the various stakeholders. As a result directions are not always consistent and slow decision making often slows down projects.

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